Are You in Your Right Mind? (or Your Left?)

The psychological aspects of left- and right-brain orientation are fascinating because they give us clues to the mysteries of personality and our different affinities. According to the theory, which developed from the work of Nobel Prize scientist Roger Sperry, the way we see the world and operate within it is vastly different for the left-brain and right-brain individual. Which are you?

The brain is indeed divided into two hemispheres, with each specializing in different areas of concentration, and we obviously use both. The left side of the brain controls the right side of the body, and vice versa. But there is a phenomenon known as brain asymmetry, which makes one side dominant. Left-handedness, for example, is a general indicator of right-brain dominance.

The left brain, which controls the right side of the body, is the part that seeks to analyze and organize data into systems. The disciplines of mathematics, language and logic are said to spring from the left brain. The left brain is the home of rational thought, linear and sequential organization, precision and logic.

According to the popular psychological theory, a left-brain individual could be described as organized, analytical, logical, traditional and dependable.

The right brain, which controls the left side of the body, is considered the creative and associative aspect. Art, music, storytelling, metaphysics, curiosity and even romantic love are believed to originate from this area of the brain. The right brain is the dreamer, the visionary, the part that “thinks outside of the box.”

The right-brain person is often described as imaginative, restless, seeking, unpredictable, creative or artistic.

Of course, all of us use both aspects in our daily lives, and not everyone buys into the right-brain/left-brain dominance theory. An accountant can play the guitar, and an actor can be good at math and science. A film editor must use both hemispheres on a daily basis, as must an architect. Scientist and mathematician Albert Einstein comes to mind as someone who was obviously working brilliantly from both sides of his brain.

Levenger caters to both left- and right-brain preferences, with products that combine beauty with function, for all our brainy customers.

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